Why Do People Love Kinky Sex So Much? Allow Science To Explain

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Just last week, we told you about how women—yes, women—are actually on the hunt for kinkier sex, making us men wonder why they prefer it to just a decent romp sesh every couple days.

While some couples may be afraid to tie up, whip, spank, handcuff, dominate or do whatever crazy fetishes they may come up with, there's actually a proven, scientific reason why BDSM is so desired—and, thanks to Broadly, we have an answer.

According to the Broadly piece, the "high" feeling that many people experience during bondage has an actual term: subspace. It's this pleasure that takes people's minds to a place of pure nirvana, or so says Kathryn Klement, a researcher at the Science of BDSM.

"Like many potentially stressful or extreme experiences (e.g., sky-diving, fire-walking), individuals' bodies react to that stress when they engage in BDSM," Science of BDSM researcher Kathryn Klement told Broadly. "We interpret these cortisol results to mean that when people engage in BDSM play (as the receiver of sensations) or extreme rituals, their bodies release a hormone usually associated with stress. However, we've also found that people subjectively report their psychological stress decreasing, so there is a disconnect between what the body is experiencing, and what the individual is perceiving."

"We interpret these changes to be evidence of subspace, an altered state of consciousness that people who are receiving sensations (the bottoms) can experience," Klement adds.

To further support this theory, Dr. Brad Sagarin—a professor of social and evolutionary psychology at Northern Illinois University and founder of the Science of BDSM research team—compares it to the high a runner might feel while pounding the pavement on a long run. It's that sense of euphoria and increased tolerance for pain that those people enjoy.

So, too, do those who experience with BDSM.

During a 2009 study entitled Hormonal Changes and Couple Bonding in Consensual Sadomasochistic Activity, Dr. Sagarin discovered that participants who reported their SM activities went well showed less stress (cortisol) and increases in relationship closeness. When performed consensually, the kinkier sex actually proved to increase intimacy between couples.

While there's still plenty of research to be done—and, like everything BDSM isn't for everyone—this info shows that, when done with a trusting partner, kinky sex can have a positive impact and actually help bring couples closer together. It's also releases endorphins in the brain that can be compared to other thrill-seeking activities like sky-diving and bungee jumping.

Broadly

MORE: 'Kinky Sex Has Health Benefits Like You Wouldn't Believe'

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