Martin Scorsese is arguably the greatest living film director on Planet Earth. Over 15 years he made Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, Goodfellas and Casino, taking Robert De Niro from a relative unknown to the most acclaimed actor of his generation.

Nowadays Scorsese has a new De Niro in the form of Leonardo DiCaprio. But despite plenty of love for Gangs Of New York, The Aviator, Shutter Island and The Departed, none of their films have ever quite hit the ludicrously high benchmark of his earlier work.

Until now. Believe us when we tell you that The Wolf Of Wall Street will be one of the defining films of this year, the decade and even both actor and director's careers. Yes, it's three hours long, and yes, it's too soft on some of the greediest, most despicable bankers ever to grace Wall Street, but it's a goddamn masterpiece. Here are five things to get very excited about:

01 It's Scorcese's best film since Goodfellas. Partly because it's very, very funny. Funny how? Well, let's just say you've not known funny until you've seen Leo DiCaprio throw a dwarf against a giant bullseye.



02  Matthew McConaughey is at his best ever. The evolution of MM from bare-chested ladies' man to bona fide A-list hero is now complete. He's not in this film for long, but he steals the show. No mean feat given the rest of the cast.



03  Margot Robbie is the hottest girl in the world right now.
Don't believe us? Look at this and tell us otherwise.

04  Financial traders in the '90s were really out of control. If even half of what you see is remotely true (which Jordan Belfort, who the book is based on, says it is), then being a banker back then was the stuff of legend. Horrible, disgusting, greed-and-drugs-and-prostitution-filled legend.

05  It's good value for money.
Whatever you make of it, you can leave the cinema content that you've got good bang for your buck. At three hours long, it's less than 5p per minute. Just make sure you don't drink too much Coke before, or you'll be pissing everyone off.

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Words by Dan Jude. Follow him on Twitter.